SAA Basic Aikido Technique

Yoshinkan Aikido techniques


Q: Why should you study Yoshinkan Aikido?
A: Yoshinkan Aikido training is aimed at developing and cultivating three important aspects of your life: Health, Confidence and Happiness.

Heath
Aikido training has a beneficial effect on ones health. All our lessons begin with traditional Japanese exercises that are aimed at loosening stiff muscles, increasing join flexibility, and encouraging healthy blood circulation. Eastern Medicine speaks highly of flexibility: “When a man is born he is soft and flexible, and when he dies he is stiff and hard. Stiffness is a characteristic of death and softness a characteristic of life”. According to doctors of Eastern Medicine, exercising one's joints helps “to circulate energy inside one's body and flexible mobile joints lead to long life.” Yoshinkan aikido training leads to weight loss, increased balance and coordination, improved blood circulation and better overall health.

Confidence
Yoshinkan Aikido is a powerful martial art form taught within the ranks of the Tokyo Police Department, in particular to members of the Elite Riot Police. Yoshinkan Aikido enjoys popularity among members of security forces, armed services and private contractors world-wide. This is because of the great attention Yoshinkan places on the practical aspect of using aikido techniques to apprehend, disarm and disable aggressive, belligerent adversaries. For this reason, Yoshinkan is considered the “hard” style among the various schools of Aikido. Yoshinkan Aikido also offers a unique training system. The founders of Yoshinkan distilled all the motions used in Aikido into 6 simple movements that can be practiced solo or with a partner. Since the key to Aikido is achieving control over one's own body, this approach has proven to allow students to master complex and effective techniques in a relatively short period of time. It also has a great reputation for preparing people for real-life situations, allowing even beginning students of Yoshinkan Aikido to easily defeat aggressive opponents. After several lessons, it is normal for our students to acquire a fearless confidence in themselves, which is a natural result of their ability to defend themselves and others from assailants.

Happiness
The highest goal of aikido training is not simply the mastery of self-defense techniques or obtaining an excellent state of health. The main goal of Aikido training is to learn to harmonize ones self with the surrounding world and, ultimately, with nature. When performing techniques we learn that a strong attack should be met and absorbed with a soft response. In this way we learn to harmonize with the attacker: absorb their attacking energy, harness it, redirect it, and use it against them. The same principals taught at our lessons are applicable in daily life as well. The teachings of peace, harmony, unshakable equanimity that comprise the core of Aikido’s spiritual message guide our students to happiness in this life and freedom from animosity, obsessive thinking and mental suffering. Aikido increases one’s mental happiness and joy by learning to accept the world as it is and embarking on one’s own path to peace.



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